Standing Up For You

When does your child need a booster seat?

Car accidents that involve children can lead to devastating injuries, particularly if the child does not have the proper restraints. Over 90 percent of children aged four to eight suffered serious injuries in car accidents without a booster seat.

Once a child ages out of a car seat, Kentucky lawmakers require children to use a booster seat.

Does your child need a booster seat?

Kentucky takes the child’s age and height into consideration with its booster seat regulations. Children who stand over 57 inches tall or children over the age of eight do not have to ride in a booster seat. A nine-year-old who stands less than 57 inches tall can ride without the booster seat and you will not suffer any consequences for it. However, a child under 57 inches can still suffer serious injuries without a child seat. Children under the age of eight but over the height requirement are also exempt.

How can you properly secure your child?

When a child sits on the car’s seat with no booster, the lap and shoulder belt do not fit properly. For small children, shoulder straps may cross their throat instead of their shoulders. In a collision, the belt pulls across their throat and can leave serious neck injuries. The lap belt tends to cover the stomach and hence leaves serious abdominal injuries. A child’s booster seat solves the problem by lifting the child so that the lap belt can fit high on the thighs or low on the hips. The shoulder strap should be across the collarbone and snug.